23 Apr
2010
Posted in: Home Brewing
By    1 Comment

Home Brewing – Problem with Airlock, Beer Bubbling into Airlock, Fermeter Overflowing

So I started my second batch of beer this week. This time it wasn’t a kit with all the ingredients together in a box. I went to my local home brew shop to buy all the ingredients that were needed for a recipe that I got out of a home brewing book. I followed the direction perfectly and everything seemed to be going great.

About 2 days into the fermenting process I noticed that the beer in the fermenter had started bubbling up so high that it was coming up through the airlock. This was causing some problems because it started to clock the airlock and get lots of pressure build up in the fermenter. (The picture to the right shows what I am talking about)

So I took the airlock off, cleaned it out. Opened the fermenter up, and gently brushed some up the bubbles around to help the settle a bit, then put the lid back on with a clean airlock in place. This seemed to work fine for another day or two then the same problem happened again!

So I cleaned the airlock again, and settled the bubbles down in the fermenter. After that it never happened again. But for those couple days it was making a mess.

Does anyone know why this happens?  Was my beer level too high in the fermenter bucket?  Is it because of the type of yeast, or ingredients that I used in the recipe?

The recipe was for a Honey Ginger Ale. Called for about 2lbs of honey, that was the only thing out of the ordinary that I used. Could this cause the beer to foam up that much?

It was also my first time using one of those activator yeast packets. It seemed to be much more active in the beer than the dry yeast that you sprinkle in. Is it the yeast that can cause it to bubble this much?

If anyone has some answers to how I can avoid this for future batches I would really appreciate it.  Post a comment below if you have any ideas!

Buy Home Brewing Airlocks

1 Comment

  • In my experience what you are experiencing is caused by happy yeast chomping down on the sugar provided with a little too much gusto because of the temperature, if you stash your brew in a cooler place it should reduce the occurrence of this. Good Luck and Happy Brewing

So, what do you think?